August 16, 2017

Volume 1, Number 1 (Fall 2010)

 

EDITOR’S INTRODUCTION

Richard W. Schwester, Ph.D.
Managing Editor

The newly launched Journal of Critical Incident Analysis (JCIA) is an initiative of the Academy for Critical Incident Analysis (ACIA) at John Jay College of Criminal Justice. ACIA was founded for the purpose of promoting a scholarly dialogue relating to the emergence, management, and consequences of critical incidents. Accordingly, JCIA is an extension of this purpose, and it is envisioned as an outlet for empirical research and theoretical discussions about critical incidents. In this inaugural issue of JCIA, we present three refereed articles and one invited monograph.

Keywords: critical incident, critical incident analysis

Peer-Reviewed Scholarship

 

A CONCEPTUAL MODEL FOR CRITICAL INCIDENT ANALYSIS

Elizabeth A. Kirby, Ed.D.

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a conceptual model designed for critical incident analysis. The framework offered by this model is intended to guide the analysis of critical incidents and enhance the ability to understand, mitigate, and negotiate the episodes and incidents in society that have a great impact and deep significance for humankind. The model consists of three essential elements, the event, political arena, and authorized interveners, each of which is influenced by the media and context of the critical incident. An operational definition of a critical incident, identification of different types of incidents, and an overview of model components establish a common lens and foundation for rich and meaningful analysis.

Keywords: conceptual model, critical incident, critical incident analysis

 

 

 

SIMULATION OF INTERVENTION IN CRITICAL INCIDENTS USING AGENT BASED MODELING

Robert Till, Ph.D.

As defined by Ochberg, a critical incident is “a relatively brief occurrence involving injury, loss, conflict, discovery or change of significant proportion, usually unscripted and unanticipated, with the potential to alter existing societal norms. Critical incidents are usually traumatic, threatening the bonds of trust that bind communities, but may be positive, initiating historic consequents” (See Academy for Critical Incident Analysis). Agent Based Modeling (ABM) is commonly used to model critical incidents at the threat level, specifically the interaction between the threat and the target. Tactics of interveners (first responders) are only beginning to be incorporated into these models. This paper will demonstrate some current examples of how ABM is used to model threat-target interactions. It will then present a simple prototype ABM of a critical incident event and a possible tactical intervention will then be demonstrated. A framework for the development of a larger strategic model is also discussed.

Keywords: agent based modeling, critical incident, critical incident analysis

 

 

 

CRITICAL INCIDENTS, INVISIBLE POPULATIONS, AND PUBLIC POLICY: A CASE OF THE LGBT COMMUNITY

Roddrick Colvin, Ph.D.

This exploratory research paper discusses important issues in public policy and service delivery, critical incidence analysis, and invisible communities. Using the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community as a case study, I raise several questions about critical issues, including: How does critical incident analysis fit into study of public policy and how do we understand invisible communities in critical incident analysis, and what next steps are needed to improve critical incidence analysis with regards to invisible communities? In order to improve our understanding of these issues, I recommend a deeper study of social construction of target populations, more systematic data gathering on invisible communities, and increased media accountability and standards.

Keywords: lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, critical incident, critical incident analysis, social construction, invisible communities

 

 

 

Monographs

 

VIRGINIA TECH AFTER 4/16: SOLIDARITY, COMMUNITY, AND RECOVERY

Arnold R. “Skip” Isaacs

The Academy for Critical Incident Analysis at John Jay College and the Virginia Tech Center for Peace Studies and Violence Prevention assembled a multidisciplinary group of scholars, administrators, mental health specialists and journalists in Blacksburg, Virginia, to deliberate and reflect on the consequences and reverberations from the April 16, 2007 shootings on the Virginia Tech campus.

Keywords: critical incident, critical incident analysis, violence, violence prevention, aftermath dynamics